Volume 21, Issue 2: Food Policy

Articles

An Examination of Whether U.S. Country of Origin Labeling Legislation Plays a Role in Protecting Consumers from Contaminated Food

Wendy A. Johnecheck

A growing number of consumers has concerns about the safety of the U.S. food supply. This Article addresses whether consumers can effectively use country-of-origin labeling information to reduce their risk of consuming contaminated food as well as whether the government and industry can use the verification system underpinning the country-of-origin labeling requirements to facilitate the trace-back of a contaminated food item to its source. Parts I and II of the Article examine the primary legislation in place prior to the implementation of the U.S. Read more about An Examination of Whether U.S. Country of Origin Labeling Legislation Plays a Role in Protecting Consumers from Contaminated Food

  • April 2010
  • 21 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 191
  • Article

Nutrient Pollution from Land Application of Manure: Discerning a Remedy for Pollution

The production and processing of food involves byproducts that may create problems if not handled appropriately. The regulations of CAFOs under the Clean Water Act began more than thirty years ago when Congress defined these production facilities as point sources of pollution. Until the late 1990s, few CAFOs were employing nutrient management plans to limit applications of manure nutrients being applied to fields. Read more about Nutrient Pollution from Land Application of Manure: Discerning a Remedy for Pollution

  • April 2010
  • 21 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 213
  • Article

E Pluribus Unum: Data and Operations Integration in the California Criminal Justice System

When an offender enters the criminal justice system, he is subject to the many agencies that make up the "system," including their individual processes and functionality. Due to this lack of cohesion among the agencies and the large scale of the state and local systems, the result is an information management problem. The Stanford Criminal Justice Center completed a project on data and operations integration, bringing together individuals from all facets of the system to discuss the integration problem. Read more about E Pluribus Unum: Data and Operations Integration in the California Criminal Justice System

  • April 2010
  • 21 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 277
  • Article

Striking Back: Using Death Penalty Cases to Fight Disproportionate Sentences Imposed Under California's Three Strikes Law

In Gregg v. Potter, defense attorney Anthony Amsterdam famously argued "death is different." While the death penalty was not found to be unconstitutional, this argument began the practice of special constitutional protections for capital defendants. The Article expands on this argument with respect to criminal constitutionality issues in California's notably harsh "Three Strikes" law sentencing scheme. It explains the Mills Criminal Defense Clinic's pursuit of challenging and litigating cases for clients sentenced under this law. Read more about Striking Back: Using Death Penalty Cases to Fight Disproportionate Sentences Imposed Under California's Three Strikes Law

  • April 2010
  • 21 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 311
  • Article

Return to Sender: Responses to Professor Carrington et al. Regarding Four Proposals for a Judiciary Act of 2009

Proponents of judicial reform contend that life tenure for Supreme Court judges, as ensured by Article III of the U.S. Constitution, is causing appointments to be irregularly long due to increased lifespans. Reformists see numerous negative impacts from the expanded tenure, but this Article argues that reform in the appointment process would have greater negative consequences. Specifically, the Article discusses a proposal for reform submitted by Professor Carrington. Read more about Return to Sender: Responses to Professor Carrington et al. Regarding Four Proposals for a Judiciary Act of 2009

  • April 2010
  • 21 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 349
  • Article

Notes

Imagining Immigration without DOMA

Jordana Lynne Mosten

While many states and countries allow same-sex marriages, if a gay American citizen marries in one of the lawful jurisdictions, she still cannot sponsor her spouse to immigrate. This obstacle is largely due to the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), which defines marriage as a union between a man and woman. This Note discusses DOMA’s impact on same-sex marriage immigration, as well as addresses how the definition of marriage has evolved and why congressional authorization is ultimately needed to allow same-sex immigration. Read more about Imagining Immigration without DOMA

  • April 2010
  • 21 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 383
  • Note