Volume 21, Issue 1: Academic Integrity

Articles

Complexities in Legislative Suppression of Diploma Mills

The connection between education and personal economic advantage drives a global market for higher education. Diploma mills, businesses that sell bogus degrees to customers in search of easy credentials, are a response to the market. In this Article, we discuss the federal-state partnership and the possible shape of a federal law that would criminalize the operation of a diploma mill. We then look at the current state of the field to see where state and federal efforts to suppress diploma mills have been successful and where they have come up wanting. Read more about Complexities in Legislative Suppression of Diploma Mills

  • January 2010
  • 21 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 1
  • Article

Academic Integrity and Legal Scholarship in the Wake of Exxon Shipping, Footnote 17

Charles E. Clarke, Jr.

This Article discusses Footnote 17 of Justice Souter’s majority opinion in Exxon Shipping Co. v. Baker. In Part I and II, we discuss why we think Footnote 17 is misguided: courts and attorneys should not assess the integrity of academic work solely by whether an interested party funded it. Rather, the legal community should adopt the standards already in place in the scientific community. Read more about Academic Integrity and Legal Scholarship in the Wake of Exxon Shipping, Footnote 17

  • January 2010
  • 21 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 33
  • Article

A Movement, A Lawsuit, and the Integrity of Sponsored Law and Economics Research

This Article discusses Footnote 17 of Justice Souter’s majority opinion in Exxon Shipping Co. v. Baker. In that case, which involved Exxon Shipping Company’s challenge to a $4.5 billion punitive damages award in the notorious Exxon Valdez litigation, the Court had to decide the limits that federal maritime law placed on punitive damage awards. Read more about A Movement, A Lawsuit, and the Integrity of Sponsored Law and Economics Research

  • January 2010
  • 21 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 51
  • Article

Combatting the Funding Effect in Science: What’s Beyond Transparency?

This Article examines the evolution of the public’s concerns over conflicts of interest (COIs) in science. This Article discusses the ethical foundations of COIs and the remedies that have been proposed by the government, academic institutions, journals and professional societies in repsonse to these concerns. This Article identifies initiatives designed to prevent and proscribe conflicts of interest rather than accepting them as inevitable and adopting transparency as the primary response. Read more about Combatting the Funding Effect in Science: What’s Beyond Transparency?

  • January 2010
  • 21 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 81
  • Article

Corporate Manipulation of Research: Strategies Are Similar Across Five Industries

Recently several industries have been required to release their internal documents as a result of litigation and, in some cases, congressional inquiry. This Article compares the strategies used by the tobacco, pharmaceutical, lead, vinyl chloride, and silicosis-generating industries to manipulate research. Read more about Corporate Manipulation of Research: Strategies Are Similar Across Five Industries

  • January 2010
  • 21 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 105
  • Article

Academic Fraud Today: Its Social Causes and Institutional Responses

This Article addresses academic integrity and its converse: academic fraud. This Article contends that only a comprehensive approach can meet the challenge of academic fraud. The first task in dealing with academic fraud is to identify activities that present enough of a threat to the research mission that they should be singled out for special sanction. Read more about Academic Fraud Today: Its Social Causes and Institutional Responses

  • January 2010
  • 21 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 135
  • Article

Notes

EC in D.C.: An Analysis of Washington D.C.’s Emergency Contraception Legislative

In 2009, Washington, D.C. passed a law requiring that sexual assault victims in the District’s emergency rooms be given information about and access to emergency contraception (EC). The law joined a group of thirteen other state “EC in the ER” (emergency contraception in the emergency room) laws, but it is potentially stronger than existing legislation is. Despite these advances, D.C’s law has fallen short in its implementation: those charged with ensuring that the law is complied with seem unaware of the law and their enforcement responsibilities. Read more about EC in D.C.: An Analysis of Washington D.C.’s Emergency Contraception Legislative

  • January 2010
  • 21 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 155
  • Note

A Delicate Balance: Connecticut’s Minimum Water Flow Statute

Bryce Kaufman

This Note contends that changing the minimum flow standards in Connecticut is not a panacea and does not fix the fundamental problem of the existence of registered diverters preventing Connecticut from being able to implement a comprehensive water allocation policy. Nonetheless, PA 05-142 is a major step forward in modernizing, and expanding the coverage of Connecticut’s water scheme. The law reflects a cogent attempt to scientifically and effectively balances the demands of water users with the benefits of flowing waters. Read more about A Delicate Balance: Connecticut’s Minimum Water Flow Statute

  • January 2010
  • 21 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 179
  • Note