Volume 17, Issue 1: Health Care in America (A New Generation of Challenges)

Articles

Politics, Health Policy, and the American Character

Philip Lee
Thomas Oliver
A.E. Benjamin
Dorothy Lee

This Article reviews elements of history, social science, and health policy literature focusing on the distinctive elements of American political ideology and institutions, as well as how that context has shaped the nation’s health policy. The Article contends that the American character is at the center of a long struggle over whether government should treat medical care as a market good or a public good.   Read more about Politics, Health Policy, and the American Character

  • January 2006
  • 17 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 7
  • Article

Market Principles: The Right Prescription for Medicaid

For thirty-five years, Florida’s most vulnerable families have relied on the state’s Medicaid program for critical health care services. Since 1999, Florida’s tax revenue has grown an average of 4.9% each year. This is a robust growth rate that is completely outstripped by Medicaid costs, which raised an average of 13% each year during the same period. Read more about Market Principles: The Right Prescription for Medicaid

  • January 2006
  • 17 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 33
  • Article

Long-Term Care: The Forgotten Health Care Challenge

American families are increasingly learning that they cannot have income security without health care security, particularly if a family member is older or disabled. The demographic inevitability of the aging of the baby-boom population and the resultant health cost burdens that such aging will impose on families and the government will create substantial economic and political pressures to take action on long-term care. Read more about Long-Term Care: The Forgotten Health Care Challenge

  • January 2006
  • 17 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 57
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Conscience in Context: Pharmacist Rights and the Eroding Moral Marketplace

This Article outlines the contours of a marketplace where religiously shaped norms and values are allowed to operate and compete without invoking the trump of state power. The Article explores the marketplace’s ramifications for the roles and responsibilities of pharmacists. Read more about Conscience in Context: Pharmacist Rights and the Eroding Moral Marketplace

  • January 2006
  • 17 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 83
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Law, Medicine, and Wealth: Does Concierge Medicine Promote Health Care Choice, or Is It a Barrier to Access?

This Article explores the legal, ethical, and policy implications of concierge medicine. Part I of the Article examines the forces that have induced concierge physicians to reject the restrictions of managed care and move toward a more independent practice form. Part II discusses potential legal impediments from state insurance regulators, private insurers, and federal regulators. Read more about Law, Medicine, and Wealth: Does Concierge Medicine Promote Health Care Choice, or Is It a Barrier to Access?

  • January 2006
  • 17 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 121
  • Article

A Drug by Any Other Name...? Paradoxes in Dietary Supplement Risk Regulation

This Article focuses on a couple of paradoxes that may prove useful in the risk regulation of dietary supplements that otherwise fully comply with the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA)’s requirements for manufacturing and labeling. Read more about A Drug by Any Other Name...? Paradoxes in Dietary Supplement Risk Regulation

  • January 2006
  • 17 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 165
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A New Progressivism

There are serious problems with the two twentieth-century approaches to government: the way of markets and the way of planning. The New Progressivism simultaneously offers (1) a distinctive conception of government’s appropriate means, an outgrowth of the alter-twentieth-century critique of economic planning, and (2) a distinctive understanding of government’s appropriate ends, an outgrowth of evident failures with market arrangements and largely a product of the mid-twentieth-century critique of laissez faire. Read more about A New Progressivism

  • January 2006
  • 17 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 197
  • Article

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