Volume 24, Issue 2: The Future of the Legal Profession

Articles

The Failure of Crits and Leftist Law Professors to Defend Progressive Causes

The trend of increasing law school annual tuitions has marked an era in which finances serve as a barrier to entry for many people. While liberal law professors often advocate for greater access to the legal profession and its services, there has been no resistance to these high costs and their disproportionate effect on students from lower class backgrounds. This article explores the issue of rising tuition costs and challenges progressive law professors to reflect on their failure to act. Read more about The Failure of Crits and Leftist Law Professors to Defend Progressive Causes

  • June 2013
  • 24 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 309
  • Article

Things that I Learned During My First Year on the Bench that I Wish I had Known as a Trial Lawyer

The Honorable Michael H. Simon

Expanding on Aristotle’s three principles, this article furthers the core theories of what trial lawyers should understand when practicing law. This article examines each component of the acronym PLEASE – Pathos, Logos, Ethos, and the Alternative Systems (of thinking) by Everyone – and what they mean in the courtroom. Read more about Things that I Learned During My First Year on the Bench that I Wish I had Known as a Trial Lawyer

  • June 2013
  • 24 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 345
  • Article

No Law Student Left Behind

Although the “no child left behind” discussion originally referred to elementary students, the themes of the discussion have become relevant to additional facets of education, including the legal realm. This article aims to break down this relation and ignite the overdue scrutiny of the models used in legal education, which are more or less the same as they were in their origination. Instead of questioning whether to educate, it focuses the discussion on how to effectively educate. Read more about No Law Student Left Behind

  • June 2013
  • 24 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 353
  • Article

Knots in the Pipeline for Prospective Lawyers of Color: The LSAT is Not the Problem and Affirmative Action is Not the Answer

While affirmative action policies are often seen as an effective way to combat minority underrepresentation in law school, it is a solution that has yet to fix the issue. This author argues that in addition to finding a proper solution, it is important to understand the bottlenecks throughout the legal education process that prevent minority students from ultimately practicing law. This article seeks to explore minority underrepresentation by identifying the factors that diminish enrollment and the solutions that can effectively expand them. Read more about Knots in the Pipeline for Prospective Lawyers of Color: The LSAT is Not the Problem and Affirmative Action is Not the Answer

  • June 2013
  • 24 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 379
  • Article

Law School Training: Bridging the Gap Between Legal Education and the Practice of Law

The difficult job market for lawyers has been around for nearly half a decade. In light of this, there is increasing importance for law schools to provide students with a practical education that is highly marketable. This article explores how law schools can go about delivering this education and, ultimately, more work-ready graduates. Read more about Law School Training: Bridging the Gap Between Legal Education and the Practice of Law

  • June 2013
  • 24 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 425
  • Article

Getting Real About Globalization and Legal Education

In an increasingly globalized world, future lawyers must understand the importance of working in globally diverse environments. Currently, law schools only skim its surface in the curriculum, neglecting to provide students with the proper skillset to work in the globalized profession. This article emphasizes the importance of globalization to legal education and examines ways to provide the necessary experiential learning, including the challenges faced in providing them. Read more about Getting Real About Globalization and Legal Education

  • June 2013
  • 24 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 457
  • Article

Crises, Crisis Rhetoric, and Competition in Legal Education

The legal profession was not guarded from the hardships of the Depression Era, a time in which the legal market failure put into question the value of a legal education and law degree. In the current quasi-depression era, a similar rhetoric has surfaced for both similar and different reasons. This article explores the rhetoric from both eras, contextualizing the current legal market failure through the intense competition that characterizes the education process and job market. Read more about Crises, Crisis Rhetoric, and Competition in Legal Education

  • June 2013
  • 24 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 503
  • Article

Regulating Lawyers in a Liberalized Legal Services Market

In England and Wales, the passing of the Legal Services Act of 2007 allowed for a comprehensive review of legal education to begin. This article aims to demystify the implications of the review. While specifically applicable to the legal training process in England and Wales, this article points to the lessons that are relevant to the United States based on similar education features and issues. Read more about Regulating Lawyers in a Liberalized Legal Services Market

  • June 2013
  • 24 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 533
  • Article

Notes

California: Not in My Digital Backyard: Proposition 35 and California's Sex Offender Username Registry

Yonatan Moskowitz

The Californians Against Sexual Exploitation (CASE) Act was enacted with the intention of strengthening the punishments for human trafficking through legislative proposals. This Note specifically discusses the proposal to restrict the extent to which registered sex offenders can navigate the internet anonymously. It examines the history of the Act as well as its constitutional and practical implications. Read more about California: Not in My Digital Backyard: Proposition 35 and California's Sex Offender Username Registry

  • June 2013
  • 24 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 571
  • Note

California: Making A "Williamson Act" for California's Cities

Nicholas Reed

The Williamson Act of 1965 was intended to protect rural land from urban development. Assembly Bill 551, passed in February of 2013, can be viewed as an urban “Williamson Act,” as it aims to incentivize commercial agriculture where urban development is not feasible. This Note discusses the benefits of urban agriculture and the history of differential tax programs that were implemented to promote agricultural sectors within cities. Read more about California: Making A "Williamson Act" for California's Cities

  • June 2013
  • 24 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 581
  • Note

Montana: Advisory Initiatives as a Cure for the Ills of Direct Democracy? A case Study of Montana Initiative 166

Neil K. Sawhney

In 2012, Montana voters passed Initiative 166 to establish a state policy against corporate campaign contributions. While it was hailed as a “bold” initiative, the text of I-166 raised the question of whether its passage could concretely affect state law. This Note uses I-166 to examine the broader question of voter initiatives and the state of direct democracy. Finally, it also uses I-166 to shed light on the potential of advisory ballot measures and the future of representative government. Read more about Montana: Advisory Initiatives as a Cure for the Ills of Direct Democracy? A case Study of Montana Initiative 166

  • June 2013
  • 24 Stan.L.& Pol'y Rev. 589
  • Note

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