Stanford Environmental Law Journal (SELJ)

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The Stanford Environmental Law Journal (ELJ) was founded in 1978. It is run by students who are eager to explore environmental issues, improve their writing skills, and be actively involved in academic discourse. ELJ publishes articles on a variety of issues in natural resources law, environmental policy, law and economics, international environmental law, and other topics relating to law and the environment. ELJ accepts submissions from academics, practitioners, or other writers, as well as students, throughout the year.

ELJ is excited to publish Volume 36 in the 2016-17 academic year.

Current Issue

Volume 35, Number 2

Articles

Traditional Ecological Rulemaking

This Article examines the implications of an increased role for Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) in United States agency decisionmaking. Specifically, it contemplates where TEK might substantively and procedurally fit and, most importantly, whether a final agency action based on TEK would survive judicial scrutiny. Read more about Traditional Ecological Rulemaking

  • June 2016
  • 35 Stan.Envtl.L.J. 101
  • Article

An Indigenous People’s Right to Environmental Self-Determination: Native Hawaiians and the Struggle Against Climate Change Devastation

This article explores indigenous peoples’ proactive responses to the deleterious impacts of climate change by deconstructing how native peoples claim and realize an indigenous right to environmental selfdetermination. Responses to climate change must be driven by native peoples’ choices. But those choices will inevitably entail interaction with state, local, or tribal agencies, private businesses, and nonindigenous residents. Read more about An Indigenous People’s Right to Environmental Self-Determination: Native Hawaiians and the Struggle Against Climate Change Devastation

  • June 2016
  • 35 Stan.Envtl.L.J. 157
  • Article

Notes

Contamination at U.S. Military Bases: Profiles and Responses

There is an epidemic of toxic contamination at U.S. military bases. Toxins arise from a combination of military-affiliated operations, industrial sources, and natural causes. Pathways for recovery through litigation are particularly limited for veterans who bring suit against the federal government because of judicial interpretations of the Federal Tort Claims Act that preserve sovereign immunity. Benefits offered through the Department of Veteran Affairs are available to veterans who demonstrate a connection between their illness and military service. Read more about Contamination at U.S. Military Bases: Profiles and Responses

  • June 2016
  • 35 Stan.Envtl.L.J. 223
  • Note

Drinking Water in California Schools: An Assessment of the Problems, Obstacles, and Possible Solutions

In the last several years, hundreds of schools across California have been forced to restrict students’ access to drinking water due to lead, nitrate, arsenic, and other serious contaminants. News reports and water quality databases indicate that problems are especially significant in schools in low-income communities of color—where many children already face water quality contamination at home, in public spaces, and in places of worship. Read more about Drinking Water in California Schools: An Assessment of the Problems, Obstacles, and Possible Solutions

  • June 2016
  • 35 Stan.Envtl.L.J. 251
  • Note

Latest Blog

Federal vs. State Authority to Regulate Groundwater: Concerns Raised over U.S. Forest Service Proposed Directive

Blog Category: 

Editor’s Note: This piece is part of a six-part collaborative series between the Stanford Environmental Law Journal and the University of Denver Water Law Review that studies legal issues raised in Agua Caliente v. Coachella Valley Water District et al., which is currently on appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. These blog posts explore various topics related to recognition of Native American reserved rights to groundwater in the United States.

Introduction Read more about Federal vs. State Authority to Regulate Groundwater: Concerns Raised over U.S. Forest Service Proposed Directive

Tribal Reserved Water Rights to Groundwater as Recognized in Settlements and Litigation: Status and Trends

Blog Category: 

Editor’s Note: This piece is part of a six-part collaborative series between the Stanford Environmental Law Journal and the University of Denver Water Law Review that studies legal issues raised in Agua Caliente v. Coachella Valley Water District et al., which is currently on appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. These blog posts explore various topics related to recognition of Native American reserved rights to groundwater in the United States. Read more about Tribal Reserved Water Rights to Groundwater as Recognized in Settlements and Litigation: Status and Trends

Latest Online

A Note about Cumulative Impact Analysis under Functionally Equivalent Programs

Erin E. Prahler, Center for Ocean Solutions
Sarah M. Reiter, Center for Ocean Solutions
Meredith Bennett, Center for Ocean Solutions
Ashley L. Erickson, Center for Ocean Solutions
Molly Loughney Melius, Center for Ocean Solutions
Margaret R. Caldwell, Center for Ocean Solutions

An online supplement to Erin E. Prahler et al., It All Adds Up: Enhancing Ocean Health by Improving Cumulative Impact Analyses in Environmental Review Documents, 33 STAN. ENVTL. L.J. 351 (2014). Read more about A Note about Cumulative Impact Analysis under Functionally Equivalent Programs

  • August 13, 2014
  • 33 Stan.Envtl.L.J. 101